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Hafnafjordur, Iceland.

Hafnarfjordur Harbour

Hafnarfjordur Harbour

Hafnarfjordur.

Arrival.

We took the Graylines bus from the airport to Hafnarfjordur. We were staying in a strange hotel called the Viking Village. We arrived very late and had some problems getting in.

The Viking Hotel.

Actually I want to rate this hotel as good. Average is too low; very good is too high. We stayed here for four nights. The hotel is located in Hafnarfjordur, a pretty little town 25 minutes away from Reykjavik by bus. We got to the hotel from Keflavik Airport on a Graylines bus. Both Graylines and Flybus to Reykjavik pass right next to it. We arrived late at night ­after midnight. We had stated on our booking we would arrive late. The outside door was locked. We pressed the night bell -­ nothing. We tried several times. A sign told us to try the restaurant if the hotel door was locked. We did, but the restaurant was also locked. There were phone numbers on the door to phone if you could not get in. We phoned all of them but could not get through. I was ready to sleep outside, but my husband had the sense to knock the door. The receptionist appered immediately and had been there all the time, but the night bell did not work. We checked in and went up to our room -­ room 13 on the first floor. Our cards would not open the door. We tried and tried, then tired and just a little fed up we returned to reception. The receptionist let us in and fixed our cards. We had requested a double bed but got two separated singles. No big deal. The room was clean, comfortable, but basic. It was like a Viking themed Ibis. We were in the cheapest priced room. The bed had Viking style bed spreads and pillows. There was a small TV, an open style wardrobe, a couple of drawers, a kettle, 2 coffees, 2 teas, 2 sugars, 2 creamers. There was no fridge or safe. We cooled all our drinks on the window ledge. The bathroom was very small. The shower was reasonably powerful with excellent geothermally heated water ( slight sulphurous smell, the same as all hot water in Iceland. As an eczyma sufferer I loved it). The bathroom was so small, it was awkward getting in and out of the shower. Liquid soap was provided in a fixed container by the wash hand basin, none was provided in the shower. Fortuntely we had our own soap or that could have been awkward. Breakfast was from 7am to 10am. It was pretty good. There was a coffee machine, water, orange juice, bread, a toaster, crispbread, herring, cheese, cold meat, tomatoes, cucumber, boiled eggs, fruit, yogurt, cereal. The breakfast room was decorated in Viking style. Outside the buildings ­ hotel and restaurant were Viking style and there were lots of interesting Viking statues, sculptures around. The restaurant offers Viking style feasts. We did not visit it. The staff at the hotel were friendly and helpful. They stored our luggage for us, helped us find out where to buy a day pass for the bus and confirmed our return bus to the airport for us. I was annoyed by the fact our room was not cleaned on our second day, even though we had put up the please make up the room sign. We found that in the middle of the corridor and the room untouched. Not too happy about that.

The hotel has a free to use hot pot and sauna at the back. You just have to ask. The menu for the restaurant was not advertised anywhere, which was bad planning and put us off using it. Mainly the hotel was quiet at night, but it depends on your neighbour as room walls are thin. Getting into Reykjavik is easy on the number one bus from outside Fjordur Shopping mall. Price 350Isk per person. Buy the ticket from the driver. The Fjordur also has a supermarket and alcohol shop and a place to buy day passes for the bus (closed at weekends). The hotel provides free wifi, again just ask. I would stay here again as I liked Hafnarfjordur.

Viking Hotel. - Hafnarfjörður

Viking Hotel. - Hafnarfjörður

The Viking Village.

Our hotel was part of the Viking Village. There is also a restaurant which does Viking feasts. We did not take part in one of these. The Viking Village buildings are designed to look like Viking structures. There are lots of little Viking statues and rune stones etc in the grounds. Quite interesting and good for photos.

The Viking Village

The Viking Village

The Viking Village

The Viking Village

The Viking Village

The Viking Village

Beware Drunken Vikings In Hafnarfjordur.

This warning sign is on the outside wall of the Viking Hotel restaurant. We found that most Icelanders had a great sense of humour and an ability to laugh at themselves. On the whole the people we met in Iceland were very laid back, friendly and relaxed.

Beware Drunken Vikings In Hafnarfjordur.

Beware Drunken Vikings In Hafnarfjordur.

Next Day.

Next day we had a look at Hafnafjordur and went to Reykjavik. Hafnarfjordur is a very pleasant place. It has a harbour and a seaside walkway with old pictures of Hafnarfjordur. The whole town is situated on a lava field so the colourful houses are nestled behind interesting rock formations. There is a little rock filled park which is a favourite dwelling place for elves. There is an outdoor sculpture park. There are several colourful, old wooden buildings belonging to Hafnarfjordur Museum. There are three thermal swimming pools.

Hafnarfjordur Harbour.

Hafnarfjordur has an interesting, colourful working harbour which is worth a look. It also has a long walkway/cycle track along the seafront. The seafront walkway is lined with photos of old Hafnarfjordur. There are lots of seats where you can relax and enjoy the view. The light was wonderful here in summertime.

Hafnarfjordur Harbour

Hafnarfjordur Harbour

The harbour. - Hafnarfjörður

The harbour. - Hafnarfjörður

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum owns several colourful, old wooden buildings which have been made into museums. Admission is free. We only went in one, but they all looked good from the outside and took good photos.

The buildings are:

Pakkhusid at Vesturgata 8 which has an exhibition about toys.

Sivertsen's House at Vesturgata 6 which is the oldest house in Hafnarfjordur.

Bookless Bungalow at Vesturgata 32 which was built by a Scottish fisheries company in 1918 and houses an exhibition on fishing.

Siggubaer at Kirkjuvegur 10 the home of a labourer dating from 1902.

Beggubud at Vesturgata 8 which dates from 1906.

Gutto at Sudurgata 7. We did not see this. It is the Good Templars Hall dating from 1886.

These are all open daily from 11am to 5pm in June, July and August.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hafnarfjordur Museum.

Hellisgeroi Park.

Hafnarfjordur is located on a lava field and has colourful houses nestled next to weird rock formations. Lots of stories about the hidden folk - ­ elves, ­making their homes amidst the rocks around. This little park has lots of interesting lava formations, a little pond with a statue, a small waterfall and lots of flowers, not to mention a centre for elves!! We just looked at the park by ourselves but you can book a tour with local resident, Sigurbjorg Karlsdottir. Tuesdays and Fridays at 14:30 during the summer or by request. Price 3900 Isk. Duration one and a half hours. The guided tour was going round as we walked round and she must have been quite entertaining as a guide judging by the laughter we kept hearing.

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Hellisgeroi Park

Wild flowers. - Hafnarfjörður

Wild flowers. - Hafnarfjörður

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park.

This sculpture park contains 16 sculptures created by artists from around the world. Some of the works were interesting, some not depending on your taste. There is a campsite here and a lovely church. A thermal swimming pool is nearby.

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Vidistadatun Sculpture Park

Sculpture Park ­ Viking Themed Play Park.

We loved this great little Viking play park in the sculpture park. I think it is a lovely idea to have all the play things in traditional Viking style. It exposes children to traditional art and also really looks attractive and interesting. It also gives me something else to photograph.

Sculpture Park - Viking Themed Play Park.

Sculpture Park - Viking Themed Play Park.

Sculpture Park - Viking Themed Play Park.

Sculpture Park - Viking Themed Play Park.

Churches.

There were several pretty churches in Hafnarfjordur. We passed the first one in the pictures daily when we walked into the centre of the town from our hotel. It was not ever open so we did not manage to look inside the building. Churches here tended to be quite simple and plain but still interesting and attractive.

Churches

Churches

Churches

Churches

Geothermal Swimming.

Although we love swimming we did not have time to visit Hafnarfjordur's geo thermal pools. Apparently there are three. We just went in the hot pot in the Viking Hotel. Obviously that was too small for swimming, but the waters leave you feeling great. My eczyma disappeared after a day or two in Iceland.

Geothermal Swimming

Geothermal Swimming

Kopavogur Church.

We stopped off to look at this odd looking church in Kopavogur. The number one bus from Hafnarfjordur to Reykjavik passes it. We noticed it from our bus journeys and were quite intrigued by its shape and location.

Kopavogur Church.

Kopavogur Church.

Kopavogur Church.

Kopavogur Church.

Restaurants:

Gamla Vinhusid:

Avoid the burger. This restaurant's name means the old winehouse. It is located at Vesturgata 4. It is an attractive looking restaurant and service was pleasant and friendly. I had quite a tasty pizza, but my husband had a burger and found it really fatty and awful, so we did not eat here again. The gull beer was good, though and the restaurant is nicely decorated with wine bottles all round the room. Next to Hafnarfjordur Museum.

At least the beer was good. - Hafnarfjörður

At least the beer was good. - Hafnarfjörður

Shopping:

Fjordur Shopping Centre: Handy Shopping Centre.

This shopping mall had a supermarket, an alcohol shop, a place to buy day tickets for the bus, closed at weekends and a cafe. The bus station was just outside. This shopping mall is very centrally located.

Handy Shopping Centre.

Handy Shopping Centre.

Transport:

Buses To Reykjavik.

There is a small bus station outside the Fjordur Shopping Mall. Bus 1 in the direction of Hlemmur goes to Reykjavik. Bus tickets cost 350 isk and can be bought from the driver. Ask for a ticket if you want to transfer buses. The ticket is valid for use on other buses for an hour after purchase. Time into Reykjavik is around 25 minutes. Buses run till round 10 at night. They do not start early at weekends.

Buses

Buses

Keflavik Airport To Hafnarfjordur.

The Graylines and Flybus buses from Keflavik Airport can drop you in Hafnarfjordur. For pick up, at least on Graylines, phone up to confirm. The drive from the airport passes along the coast and through several lava fields. The landscape is blackened and dead looking but interesting all the same.

Posted by irenevt 20:30 Archived in Iceland

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Comments

Great memories for me - we had a lovely dinner at the Viking Village restaurant as part of last year's VT meet!

by ToonSarah

Hi Sarah, we did not get round to eating there, but we liked Hafnafjordur very much. All the best, Irene

by irenevt

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